Below are select skills in this industry as identified by LinkedIn data and Strayer@Work’s proprietary analysis.

The supply number indicates how many times more likely a person in this industry is to have a particular skill than the general population of LinkedIn users.

The demand number indicates how high or low demand is for that skill among employers.

The gap number shows how adequately the supply of a skill meets the demand for that skill. A negative gap number indicates an opportunity for job seekers to make themselves more marketable by developing that skill and for companies to develop the skill within their workforce.

Below are select skills in this industry as identified by LinkedIn data and Strayer@Work’s proprietary analysis.

The supply number indicates how many times more likely a person in this industry is to have a particular skill than the general population of LinkedIn users.

The demand number indicates how high or low demand is for that skill among employers.

The gap number shows how adequately the supply of a skill meets the demand for that skill. A negative gap number indicates an opportunity for job seekers to make themselves more marketable by developing that skill and for companies to develop the skill within their workforce.

TOP SKILLS

 SUPPLY

 DEMAND

% GAP

Key Takeaways:
  1. Financial services organizations continue to face pressure to innovate as financial technology start-ups disrupt the industry.
  2. The bulk of the top skills deficits in technology are juxtaposed with surpluses in traditional skills.
Key Takeaways:
  1. Overall, the industry skills gap remained fairly steady from Q1 to Q2 2016, perhaps suggesting a lack of growth in the finance industry.
  2. Large deficits in technical skills also suggest there may be more opportunity for IT professionals in industries outside of IT.
Key Takeaways:
  1. A range of factors, from the Great Recession to decades of outsourcing, have combined to create a shortage of qualified candidates that will only be exacerbated in the coming years.
  2. Without action, financial services institutions will see critical skills such as strategy and profit and loss management walk out the door as their workforce retires.
  3. Banks and firms should move quickly to implement strategies to retain baby boomers and facilitate knowledge transfer to the next generation of leaders.