Below are select skills in this industry as identified by LinkedIn data and Strayer@Work’s proprietary analysis.

The supply number indicates how many times more likely a person in this industry is to have a particular skill than the general population of LinkedIn users.

The demand number indicates how high or low demand is for that skill among employers.

The gap number shows how adequately the supply of a skill meets the demand for that skill. A negative gap number indicates an opportunity for job seekers to make themselves more marketable by developing that skill and for companies to develop the skill within their workforce.

Below are select skills in this industry as identified by LinkedIn data and Strayer@Work’s proprietary analysis.

The supply number indicates how many times more likely a person in this industry is to have a particular skill than the general population of LinkedIn users.

The demand number indicates how high or low demand is for that skill among employers.

The gap number shows how adequately the supply of a skill meets the demand for that skill. A negative gap number indicates an opportunity for job seekers to make themselves more marketable by developing that skill and for companies to develop the skill within their workforce.

TOP SKILLS

 SUPPLY

 DEMAND

% GAP

Food and Beverage
Key Takeaways:
  1. Large deficits in analytical skills persist as the industry becomes increasingly data-driven but has failed to offer wages for those skills on par with other industries.
  2. With extreme surpluses in traditional skills throughout the year, and a 72% surplus of skills overall by Q4, the best way for candidates to distinguish themselves in this industry is likely by having nontraditional or administrative skills.
Key Takeaways:
  1. As data continues to drive and affect all industries, more than half of the skills in food and beverage moved toward a deficit—especially analytics and managerial skills.
  2. Traditional industry skills remain in surplus.
Key Takeaways:
  1. The food and beverage industry appears to enjoy an ample supply of entry-level workers with traditional skills—but low wages and little perceived opportunity for advancement may be causing high turnover and curtailing the development of experienced managers.
  2. To stem this trend, employers will need to find ways to create career development paths for their employees.
Key Takeaways:
  1. Business is booming for restaurants, but an increase in establishments has led to a tight labor market.
  2. As restaurateurs turn their focus on employee retention to reduce turnover, they must also ensure that they are able to attract candidates with the necessary skills.
  3. Employers must also reduce high turnover and hold on to quality talent by, for example, providing education benefits and defining career paths within the industry.