Below are select skills in this industry as identified by LinkedIn data and Strayer@Work’s proprietary analysis.

The supply number indicates how many times more likely a person in this industry is to have a particular skill than the general population of LinkedIn users.

The demand number indicates how high or low demand is for that skill among employers.

The gap number shows how adequately the supply of a skill meets the demand for that skill. A negative gap number indicates an opportunity for job seekers to make themselves more marketable by developing that skill and for companies to develop the skill within their workforce.

Below are select skills in this industry as identified by LinkedIn data and Strayer@Work’s proprietary analysis.

The supply number indicates how many times more likely a person in this industry is to have a particular skill than the general population of LinkedIn users.

The demand number indicates how high or low demand is for that skill among employers.

The gap number shows how adequately the supply of a skill meets the demand for that skill. A negative gap number indicates an opportunity for job seekers to make themselves more marketable by developing that skill and for companies to develop the skill within their workforce.

TOP SKILLS

 SUPPLY

 DEMAND

% GAP

Key Takeaways:
  1. Companies still desperately need workers with technology skills to protect information as they move to digitize data. Traditional industry skills are experiencing a surplus that rose steadily throughout the year.
Key Takeaways:
  1. Increased use of wearables and mobile tech has spurred new software jobs, while wellness skills remain in surplus.
Key Takeaways:
  1. A push to digital across industries is leaving gaping holes in the ranks of healthcare organizations, suggesting that the digitization of healthcare is rapidly creating more jobs than organizations have been able to fill. At the same time, a continued surplus of nursing skills (31%) corresponds to deficits in leadership positions and staff management (22% deficit).
  2. The industry should focus on attaining digital talent and developing leaders, while considering the potential effects of a growing reliance on remote access.
Key Takeaways:
  1. In the rapidly evolving healthcare industry, the clinical nurse leader (CNL) will play a pivotal role in implementing new strategies, coordinating care, and leading change.
  2. Although CNLs are well prepared for managing patient care, research indicates that many lack the soft skills and technology acumen needed to excel in this dynamic environment.
  3. Providers should reassess their training programs and look to best practices outside of the industry to ensure their CNLs are well equipped to tackle the challenges ahead.