Below are select skills in this industry as identified by LinkedIn data and Strayer@Work’s proprietary analysis.

The supply number indicates how many times more likely a person in this industry is to have a particular skill than the general population of LinkedIn users.

The demand number indicates how high or low demand is for that skill among employers.

The gap number shows how adequately the supply of a skill meets the demand for that skill. A negative gap number indicates an opportunity for job seekers to make themselves more marketable by developing that skill and for companies to develop the skill within their workforce.

Below are select skills in this industry as identified by LinkedIn data and Strayer@Work’s proprietary analysis.

The supply number indicates how many times more likely a person in this industry is to have a particular skill than the general population of LinkedIn users.

The demand number indicates how high or low demand is for that skill among employers.

The gap number shows how adequately the supply of a skill meets the demand for that skill. A negative gap number indicates an opportunity for job seekers to make themselves more marketable by developing that skill and for companies to develop the skill within their workforce.

TOP SKILLS

 SUPPLY

 DEMAND

% GAP

Manufacturing
Key Takeaways:
  1. According to a September 2016 Wall Street Journal article, overall skill requirements in the manufacturing industry have expanded, with jobs often requiring advanced knowledge of math and engineering.
  2. As a result, most deficits, many related to programming, grew throughout the year. The biggest surpluses throughout 2016 were in interpersonal and management skills.
Key Takeaways:
  1. Skills deficits illuminate a real need for IT and creative skills. The few surpluses exist in soft skills and management.
Key Takeaways:
  1. Many people are predisposed to see manufacturing work as low-skill work on an assembly line. However, technological change coupled with globalized competition is forcing manufacturers to evolve their labor force.
  2. Modern manufacturing jobs call for creativity to rethink and streamline processes; as such, these jobs are more compelling and satisfying than ever before. Could manufacturing be an unlikely hero for the revival of middle-skill jobs?
Key Takeaways:
  1. Manufacturing jobs are coming back to the United States, but companies are struggling to find enough qualified workers to fill open positions.
  2. To address this challenge, some manufacturers are forming public-private partnerships with local colleges and vocational programs to tailor curriculums to their specific needs.
  3. With the demand for qualified workers forecast to increase, such programs will need to be expanded to meeting the rising need for manufacturing talent.