Below are select skills in this industry as identified by LinkedIn data and Strayer@Work’s proprietary analysis.

The supply number indicates how many times more likely a person in this industry is to have a particular skill than the general population of LinkedIn users.

The demand number indicates how high or low demand is for that skill among employers.

The gap number shows how adequately the supply of a skill meets the demand for that skill. A negative gap number indicates an opportunity for job seekers to make themselves more marketable by developing that skill and for companies to develop the skill within their workforce.

Below are select skills in this industry as identified by LinkedIn data and Strayer@Work’s proprietary analysis.

The supply number indicates how many times more likely a person in this industry is to have a particular skill than the general population of LinkedIn users.

The demand number indicates how high or low demand is for that skill among employers.

The gap number shows how adequately the supply of a skill meets the demand for that skill. A negative gap number indicates an opportunity for job seekers to make themselves more marketable by developing that skill and for companies to develop the skill within their workforce.

TOP SKILLS

 SUPPLY

 DEMAND

% GAP

Key Takeaways:
  1. As more consumer spending data becomes available, retailers need data analytics skills to better serve customers.
  2. While gaps exist in these and other data management skills, overall 68% of retail skills are in surplus—especially those related to sales.
Key Takeaways:
  1. A trend of declining store visits is requiring retailers to increasingly interact with customers in new ways.
  2. Retailers are adapting with fewer, smaller stores—and the employee skill sets they seek are evolving as such.
  3. Retailers will increasingly need to train employees to focus on the entire customer journey, including social trends, to boost sales.
Key Takeaways:
  1. As companies seek to cater to customers across physical and online channels, the role of store manager had taken on added importance.
  2. Although store managers typically do well with traditional tasks, the integration of technology into all facets of retail has created a blind spot for these employees.
  3. Three strategies hold the key to enabling store managers to excel in a technology-driven, omnichannel retail environment.